Cavachon

Though fierce and brave at work, these dogs love their owners. Because they’re always eager to please, they make great family dogs. In other words, they’re very “biddable” dogs. They thrive on positive reinforcement and need to be regularly praised and rewarded for good behavior. Plus, they’re known to be great with children.

Australian Staghound

The Australian Staghound is one of the few hunting dog breed to originate from Australia. They generally hunt boar, kangaroos and sometimes larger hare. Consider the Australian Staghounds to be distant relatives of the American Staghound. However, they are not an official recognized breed (yet). This dog breed was derived from a cross between a Greyhound and Scottish Deerhound, which …

Tenterfield Terrier

Tenterfield Terriers were derived from the Old English White Terrier which no longer exists. They were terrific at killing rats but are also fantastic family pets. They were originally called the “Mini Fox Terrier” but many felt this name was misleading. After a vote, they became the Tenterfield Terrier instead. It’s a much more unique …

Australian Terrier

The Australian Terrier was first developed in 1820 and first called the Rough-coated Terrier. This feisty little dog was purposely bred for ratting and as a companion dog. The breed’s ancestors include Yorkshire Terriers, Shorthaired Skye Terrier, Cairn Terrier, Dandie Dinmont Terrier, and Irish Terriers over the years. The Australian Terrier is a small breed, …

Silky Terrier

The Australian Silky Terrier was purpose bred for catching vermin and as a companion dog. It only grows to about 10 inches high. This was a breed created in Australia in the late 1800s by crossing the Australian Terrier with a Yorkshire Terrier. It’s no wonder they look so similar to Yorkies! The aim was to breed a …

Australian Kelpie

The Australian Kelpie breed comes from the imported Scottish collie breeds used for stock work in the early 19th Century. There is much mystery surrounding how the breed developed over the years. They were partly developed from the Australian Dingo but not much else is clear about the other breeds used to develop this amazing working dog. There are two types of …

Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog

The Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog has similar origins to the Australian Cattle Dog. The stumpy tails were often preferred by the stockmen of northern New South Wales and in Queensland. In 1918, the Queensland Kennel Club created a separate standard for these dogs because they are natural bobtails and have a different temperament. They come in two colors: Red …

Australian Cattle Dog

Farmers developed the Australian Cattle Dog in the early 1800s from the Smithfield-type working dog of England. The aim was to produce a good working dog suitable for Australian conditions that was also silent. It took many attempts and iterations before the Australian Cattle Dog was born. After crossing with the Australian Dingo, Rough Collie and Bull Terrier, the …